Good riddance to 2017

Welcome 2018. And as for the annus horribilis that was 2017, well, I’m perfectly happy to see the back of it.

Honestly, it was just awful, despite a pleasant start with family. This year we’ve had one of the girls involved in a shockingly severe accident on her scooter, I have reportedly fought the mumps (that’s Halifax for ya) and possibly mono in the fall. I also spent half the year in depression which was not quite properly treated,which culminated in my firing one month before Christmas. Yay.

Of course I may well be better off not working for Ping anymore. I never quite fit in there the way I did at Actional, where I spent 8 years before being laid off. Then again that layoff did leave me rather more bitter than before. It certainly left me feeling that I can’t trust employers at all. The phrase “human resources” says it all – as an employee you’re a resource to te company, alongside capital, real estate, computers and office furniture. You are no more than that. Companies realize the negative connotation of the name and sometimes call it something else like “people operations”, but there’s no real difference. I can call myself Sebastian Vettel all I want, that’s not going to make me a four-time F1 world champion.

Perhaps my error has been in seeking salaried work when I should rather try to develop my own ideas. And so I find still a little optimism going into the new year. Maybe I can find my real calling this year. We will see.

At the Disney Store

Disney Store Ottawa
Disney Store Ottawa

The Disney Store at Rideau Centre, which as a parent I am contractually obligated to visit. They own pretty much 100% of the entertainment industry at this point, but I can’t help but notice how little stuff they have related to films and shows they did before 1990, which is a shame.

Portal 2

I’m not going to say that it’s too short a game — it’s a lot longer than the original — but it’s not been out for a week and I’ve run through it 3 times and collected all the achievements… and I’m not exactly the hard-core gamer type. Still, it’s well worth it, especially if you liked the first one.

The crime is plain to see on video, yet no charges will be filed

When Ian Tomlinson was walking home on April 1st 2009 during the G20 summit in London, he certainly had no idea that he was starting on the last walk of his life. Tomlinson was assaulted by a riot police officer whose identity was concealed, and died of resulting injuries. The whole thing was captured on video and police lied their asses off about it until the video emerged showing their actions. Yes, in London, in the middle of the biggest protests since the poll tax riots, police managed to find the one man who wasn’t protesting in any way, and killed him.

But of course you won’t see it expressed with the term “murder”, despite it being what it was. If you take a violent action which directly results in the death of the person you committed violence towards, it is murder. That is sound and established legal principle. Except if the act was committed by a police officer, evidently, since it is now official that no criminal charges will be filed against the officer responsible for the assault, nor will the officer be identified. This is the most transparent and self-serving cover-up I have ever seen in my nearly-forty-years-long life. Basically all the police has to do in the future in order to wash their hands of responsibility for their own conduct is to hire coroners who are incompetent, like Freddy Patel (who will thankfully be struck off the rolls shortly), and automatically that negates the possibility of charges ever being laid.

This is absolutely shameful and disgusting, and a blight on the UK.